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Cha Cha Cha Dance

 Cha-cha-cha, or simply cha-cha, is the name of a dance of Cuban origin.[1][2]

 
It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrín in 1953. This rhythm was developed from the danzón by a syncopation of the fourth beat. The name is onomatopoeic, derived from the rhythm of the güiro (scraper) and the shuffling of the dancers' feet.[3]
 
Origin
Cha-cha-cha rhythm[4] 
The modern style of dancing the cha-cha-chá comes from studies made by dance teacher Monsieur Pierre (Pierre Zurcher-Margolle), who partnered Doris Lavelle.[5]
 
Pierre, then from London, visited Cuba in 1952 to find out how and what Cubans were dancing at the time. He noted that this new dance had a split fourth beat, and to dance it one started on the second beat, not the first. He brought this dance idea to England and eventually created what is now known as ballroom cha-cha-cha.[6]
 
The validity of his analysis is well established for that time, and some forms of evidence exist today. First, there is in existence film of Orquesta Jorrin playing to a cha-cha-cha dance contest in Cuba; second, the rhythm of the Benny More classic Santa Isabel de las Lajas written and recorded at about the same time is quite clearly syncopated on the fourth beat. Also, note that the slower bolero-son ("rumba") was always danced on the second beat.
 
Description
 
Cha-cha-cha may be danced to authentic Cuban music, or to Latin Pop or Latin Rock. The music for the international ballroom cha-cha-cha is energetic and with a steady beat. The Cuban cha-cha-chá is more sensual and may involve complex polyrhythms.
 
Styles of cha-cha-cha dance may differ in the place of the chasse in the rhythmical structure.[7] The original Cuban and the ballroom cha-cha-cha count is "two, three, chachacha" or "four-and-one, two, three". The dance does not start on the first beat of a bar, though it can start with a transfer of weight to the lead's right.[8]
 
Nevertheless, many social dancers count "one, two, cha-cha-cha" and may find it difficult to make the adjustment to the "correct" timing of the dance.
 
 


Ballroom for all ages: Tango, Rumba, Cha cha cha, Salsa, Boston, Waltz, Slow, Paso Doble and more...
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Dance Styles
Tango
: One of the most fascinating of all dances, the tango is a sensual ballroom dance that originated in South America in the early twentieth century. Tango is usually performed by a man and a woman, expressing an element of romance in their synchronized movements. Originally, the tango was performed only by women, but once it spread into Argentina, it developed into a dance for couples. ... read more

Rumba: The rumba is originally derived from Cuba. Expressed with sensual movement and smooth swaying hips, this is the dance of romance. The characteristic of the rumba is for the lady to "tease and run." The follow flirts and entices the lead, only to run away and come back. The basic rumba dance steps are the foundation that's necessary to embody the character of the dance.... read more

How to dance Cha Cha Cha: Cha-cha-cha, or simply cha-cha, is the name of a dance of Cuban origin. It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrín in 1953. This rhythm was developed from the danzón by a syncopation of the fourth beat. The name is onomatopoeic, derived from the rhythm of the güiro (scraper) and the shuffling of the dancers' feet.... read more
 

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